Lynchcliffe Series Romance

Although Margaret & Franklin’s romance and subsequent marriage is the mainstay of romance in the Lynchcliffe series there are plenty more romantic couples more than worthy of attention since their passion and disappointments in love make the story.  Let’s have a look at some of them across the series.

HELENA & MARCUS LYNCHCLIFFE

Although Helena’s love for Marcus was clear in The Lynchcliffe Cuckoo Vol 1 their love story begins in Divided Loyalties: Lady Lynchcliffe’s Story. Helena Rycroft met Marcus Lynchcliffe when she was just fifteen years old and he was ten years older. They developed a deep enduring love that lasted the years until Marcus’s tragic death.

HELENA LYNCHCLIFFE & DR HAMISH GEORGE

Hamish loved Helena for many years before they finally became a couple. When he arrived in the locality in 1904 to replace the recently deceased Dr James Pargeter; he quickly developed a passion for Helena. After Marcus was murdered Hamish supported the family both medically and emotionally. His patience was finally rewarded in 1914 when he kissed Helena; who was distraught by Michael’s absence at war.  The couple married in 1915.

IRENE LAMBERT & LORD MICHAEL LYNCHCLIFFE

Irene was Margaret’s faithful ladies maid who came to Lynchcliffe Park with her mistress in 1912 following the death of her former employers, Lord George and Lady Celia Trevelyan on the Titanic. Irene was Margaret’s confidante during the early days when she was unable to declare her love for Franklin owing to their perceived difference in social position.

Irene fell in love with Michael early on but kept her passion quiet. She finally declared her love after Lewis Franklin Junior’s christening in 1913. Michael needed to talk about his late father, whose body Irene and Jenkins had found in the study. They courted in secret for a time before Michael made it public before leaving for the trenches in The Lynchcliffe Cuckoo Vol 2. When Michael’s war ended due to shell-shock Irene cared for and comforted him. The couple married in 1915 in a double wedding ceremony with Hamish and Helena.

SARAH LYNCHCLIFFE & DETECTIVE SERGEANT JOHN FLAGG

Sarah fell for DS Flagg when he came to solve her father’s murder.  They married in 1914 on the same day of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo. However John proved a less than satisfactory husband and left Sarah pregnant when a road accident killed him in 1915.

SARAH LYNCHCLIFFE & CHARLES BYFLEET

Charles Byfleet is an American whom Sarah met at the inquest into DS Flagg’s death in Lynchcliffe Cuckoo Vol 2. Charles has a deeply troubled relationship with his mother and his daughter by his first wife who died in a hit-and-run the same day Marcus was killed.

After a long distance correspondence, during which they became friends, Charles decided to leave his troubled life behind for a time and came to England where he and Sarah finally consummated their simmering passion.

JANE HALLIWELL & ANTHONY JENKINS

Cook Jane Halliwell fell in love with butler Anthony Jenkins many years ago but was afraid to declare herself. When Anthony is taken ill on Sarah’s wedding day the fear of loss made them both realise what they meant to each other. They married; a twilight years romance. They have been close companions ever since.

THOMAS FRAZER & FLORENCE PARGETER.

Thomas was deeply affected by the death of his first wife, Catherine; Margaret’s mother. He mourned for several years afraid of betraying her memory.  Florence came back to the area to provide moral support for Helena while Michael was at war.  She lost her first husband, Dr James Pargeter, to pneumonia in 1904.  Thomas was entranced by her and Margaret and Franklin feel hope when they see them dance together at Helena’s wedding.  The final volume of the Lynchcliffe Cuckoo series will resolve Thomas’ love story.

DR MICHAEL & MRS SARAH RYCROFT

Michael & Sarah were Helena & Celia’s parents. Deeply in love after several years of marriage they were together at the end when they died in a tragic accident in 1884.  Helena named her own children after her beloved parents.  The Rycroft’s appear in Divided Loyalties: Lady Lynchcliffe’s Story.

CELIA RYCROFT & GEORGE TREVELYAN

Celia was fifteen when she met Lord Trevelyan. He courted her gently and respectfully although he did not then realise that Celia had been raped.  Celia had major issues with intimacy but George was supportive and helpful; once he overheard her confide in someone about the rape. He tried to persuade Celia to make amends to her sister but they never did. Their story is told in Divided Loyalties: Lady Lynchcliffe’s Story.

ABRAHAM FLEMING & JOAN WATKINS.

Abe Fleming was Lewis Franklin’s best friend between 1881 and 1892.  Abe’s first wife, with whom he had shared an all-consuming passion, died of childbed fever.  Joan Watkins was Daniel Franklin’s maternal grandmother and her first husband, Paul, was verbally and physically abusive to her.  Joan met Abe in 1881 when he and Franklin spent Christmas in Scarborough and they quickly fell in love. Joan and Abe married in 1882 and remained happily married until they drowned in 1892.  Their story is told in Eye of the Storm: Lewis Franklin’s Story.

LEWIS FRANKLIN & SYLVIA JAMES

Sylvia was Franklin’s first serious girlfriend although they both knew she was not the grand passion he was searching for (she failed to make Franklin jealous when a fellow servant expressed interest in her.) Franklin and Sylvia were working for Sir Montagu Richmond, Marcus Lynchcliffe’s godfather, at the time. Franklin was Sylvia’s first lover. She finally found her own grand passion but Franklin would always have a special place in her heart. You can read about Franklin & Sylvia in Eye of the Storm: Lewis Franklin’s Story.

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